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Tag: recovery

Accepting the unknown

Was it genetics? past trauma? nutritional deficient? innate personality trait? Trying to figure out why used to stress me out more and cause even more anxiety (especially if you have OCD traits). Finding a cause is great for research. That research is monumental for not only establishing treatment modalities but also to push for insurance to cover those treatments. I’ve accepted that it could be a combination of things, but that doesn’t stop me from finding ways to manage my mental illnesses.

Being there

This is for the caregivers, significant others, family members, and friends. It is not your job to save that person. You can’t fix it, but you can support them through their struggles. It is okay to be frustrated with the disorder. It is okay to set your own boundaries when you feel like you can’t handle certain behaviors. You can understand triggers to be proactive instead of reactive. You can provide suggestions, but can’t enforce them. Loving and caring for someone with an mental illness requires your support but also… Read more Being there

Letting go of the familiar

We find comfort in the familiar, but that doesn’t make it healthy. It brings comfort because we don’t have to risk change or vulnerability. Seeking help is letting go of the familiar. Taking a chance that hopefully it will make a difference. Whether it is seeking therapy, being hospitalized, or just expressing your feelings aloud. What chances have you taken or want to take?

Symptoms vs Diagnosis

I was diagnosed at a young age with Clinical Depression, Generalized Anxiety with OCD tendencies, and Bulimia. I followed the treatment plans, found others with similar diagnoses, but something wasn’t working. I was getting worse. I was misdiagnosed. After my freshman year in college and psychotic breakdown, I was diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder II. All my previous diagnoses were symptoms of Bipolar II Disorder. The anxiety, depression, purging were symptoms/behaviors of my untreated mental illness. With having an misdiagnosis, I understand the importance of treating the symptoms and not put… Read more Symptoms vs Diagnosis

Make time but know your boundaries

Holiday season is here. That means gatherings, family, friends, and expectations. That also means anxiety, depression, loneliness, and assumptions. Try to make time for those you care about and care about you. Yet, also know your boundaries. Know when it’s time to leave or end a conversation that may be triggering. Understand that your management of your mental health is a priority. So make an effort, but know your limitations. We are all fighting a battle.

Your journey, your time

Being open and sharing is great for spreading awareness, but it isn’t necessary if it creates further issues. Never feel required to share your story. It’s yours and you have the right to share when you feel comfortable. I get some people intentions, and they mean well, but everyone isn’t ready. And that’s ok. Your past. Your journey. Your time.

Awareness of patterns and cycles

Introspection and learning how to be self aware of patterns has helped tremendously with my recovery. Picking up on the lack of sleep, barely eating, and slowly isolating myself let’s me know that an possible episode is coming. A lot of times they are inevitable, so I just have to ride the wave until it passes. Especially with seasonal changes. Keeping track can be done personally or if you have a great support system, make them aware to look out for the signs. Let me know what has worked for… Read more Awareness of patterns and cycles

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